Uridylic Acid Synthesis Essay

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In fungi and the vertebrates there can be a complete separation of the arginine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways because each pathway can derive carbamyl phosphate (CAP) from a specific carbamyl-phosphate synthetase (CAPSase). In some organisms like Neurospora the two pathways normally do not share CAP pools, but in other organisms, such as yeast, CAP can flow one “pool” to the other. The plants differ from other eukaryotes in that a single synthetase has so far been observed, with feedback regulatory characteristics typical of the bacterial synthetase , which can serve both pathways. The critical experiments have not been carried out, however, to test whether a second synthetase exists in plants. The other prominent phenomenon in eukaryotes is the appearance of enzyme complexes. In fungi , one such complex for the pyrimidine pathway exists consisting of the first two enzyme activities, namely, CPSase-ATCase (aspartate transcarbamylase). These two enzymes are coded for by a single polar gene. It is not known with certainty whether this gene codes for one or several polypeptide chains, although the studies suggest that more than one type of polypeptide chain is in the complex.

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